In its article about Paris shooting, Daily News censors photo of Charlie Hebdo front page

By LOUIS FLORES

In a report about a terror attack at the journalism offices of the Parisian weekly newspaper, Charlie Hebdo, which was widely seen as an attempt to silence critical media, The New York Daily News published a photograph that added insult to injury -- by censoring the front page of one of the issues printed by Charlie Hebdo.

In its reportage about the terroristic shooting attack at the journalism offices of Charlie Hebdo, The New York Daily News obscured the front page of a special edition published on November 2, 2011.  Source :  The New York Daily News/Screen Shot

In its reportage about the terroristic shooting attack at the journalism offices of Charlie Hebdo, The New York Daily News obscured the front page of a special edition published on November 2, 2011.  Source :  The New York Daily News/Screen Shot

At least two masked gunmen wearing black clothes stormed their way into the offices of Charlie Hebdo Wednesday, in the 11th arrondissement of Paris, shooting and killing 12 people, including 2 police officers.  Eleven other people were injured, including four in serious condition, according to an account of the attack published by the Parisian newspaper, Le Monde.

An uncredited photograph of the controversial November 3, 2011, issue of Charlie Hebdo, published by the French edition of The Huffington Post, shows the front page that The New York Daily News censored from their Web site.  Source :  The Huffington Post

An uncredited photograph of the controversial November 3, 2011, issue of Charlie Hebdo, published by the French edition of The Huffington Post, shows the front page that The New York Daily News censored from their Web site.  Source :  The Huffington Post

Lisa Dallos, a spokesperson for The New York Daily News was contacted for comment about the act of censorship, but she was out of the office.  A message was left, requesting an explanation.  As soon as Progress Queens receives a response, an update will be made. 

The offices of Charlie Hebdo had been previously targeted by extremists, who had fire bombed a different set of offices on November 2, 2011 after the newspaper was set to publish a special edition with a controversial front page depicting the prophet Muhammad saying, "100 coups de fouet, si vous n’êtes pas morts de rire !"  The phrase translates into English as, "100 lashes, if you don't die of laughter !"  Charlie Hebdo's Web site was also hacked, according to a report at that time then by BBC News.  

The censored photo published by The New York Daily News showed Charlie Hebdo editor, Stéphane Charbonnier, holding up a copy of that controversial edition.  Mr. Charbonnier was amongst the 12 people, who died in Wednesday's shooting attack.

The content of the Web site of Charlie Hebdo was removed, replaced by a meme, "Je Suis Charlie," which had been being widely shared on social media on Wednesday.  The phrase translates into English as, "I am Charlie."  Source :  Charlie Hebdo

The content of the Web site of Charlie Hebdo was removed, replaced by a meme, "Je Suis Charlie," which had been being widely shared on social media on Wednesday.  The phrase translates into English as, "I am Charlie."  Source :  Charlie Hebdo

On Twitter, defenders of free speech were critical of the decision by The New York Daily News to obscure the front page of the November 3, 2011, edition of Charlie Hebdo.

In 2007, Charlie Hebdo won a court challenge over its decision to publish controversial Danish cartoons, which some complained unfairly portrayed Islam.

In memory of those, who died and were injured in Wednesday's attack, the Charlie Hebdo Web site received heavy traffic before its Web site was replaced by a simple, memorial meme, "Je Suis Charlie," which was also translated into various languages.  The meme had been being share virally over social media on Wednesday.  Many vigils were taking place in France and around the world to honour the killed and hurt, as well as the idea of a free press.