Queens Beep to consult with NYPD about commercial trucks using residential streets in Jamaica

By LOUIS FLORES

Following a report published yesterday in Progress Queens, documenting the non-stop use by commercial truck drivers of some residential streets in Jamaica, Queens, the office of the Queens Borough President has announced plans to consult with the New York Police Department about possible traffic enforcement to address the issue.

Markings left by the tires of large and heavy commercial vehicles on the sidewalk at the northeast corner of the intersection of Liberty Avenue and 170th Street in Jamaica, Queens, as seen on October 28, 2014.  During an inspection tour of this Jamaica neighborhood, a reporter witnessed an 18-wheel tractor trailer making a wide right turn at this intersection that was only possible after the driver jumped some of the trailer's rear tires onto the sidewalk, coming within a few feet of a reporter.  Source :  Louis Flores

Markings left by the tires of large and heavy commercial vehicles on the sidewalk at the northeast corner of the intersection of Liberty Avenue and 170th Street in Jamaica, Queens, as seen on October 28, 2014.  During an inspection tour of this Jamaica neighborhood, a reporter witnessed an 18-wheel tractor trailer making a wide right turn at this intersection that was only possible after the driver jumped some of the trailer's rear tires onto the sidewalk, coming within a few feet of a reporter.  Source :  Louis Flores

The staff of Queens Borough President Melinda Katz is reviewing the matter in preparation to send a letter to the commander of the NYPD's 103rd Precinct, to get clarification as to whether any enforcement action can be taken, said Michael Scholl, the spokesperson for Borough President Katz.  If it is determined that commercial trucks are not presently banned, Mr. Scholl said that the office would look into the possibility of getting them banned.

Progress Queens reported yesterday that drivers of 18-wheel tractor trailers drove through residential streets in Jamaica, such as 170th Street.  One such 18-wheel tractor trailer was only able to make a wide right turn from westbound Jamaica Avenue onto northbound 170th Street by jumping some of the tractor trailer's tires onto the sidewalk, coming with a few feet of a reporter.  Other large and heavy commercial trucks photographed as they were being driven on 170th Street included cement trucks, armoured trucks, dump trucks, flat bed tow trucks, and MTA buses.

A traffic study of 2010 pedestrian accidents by the New York City Department of Transportation showed that an intersection in Jamaica was tied for the second-most dangerous intersection in all of Queens for pedestrian accidents.  Within the last few weeks, two traffic accidents have occurred in Jamaica, the first involving an MTA bus and the second a school bus.

Attempts to reach the Community Affairs officer for the NYPD's 103rd Precinct continued to be unsuccessful.  

City Hall, which is advancing a policy to drive traffic deaths down to zero in an initiative known as Vision Zero, has not responded to requests for comment.